Female, Female Sexual Health, Sexual wellness

Birth control

Birth control: Birth control also known as fertility control is a way for men and women to prevent pregnancy. People have been using birth control since ages but effective methods of birth control came to be known in the 20th century. There are many different methods of birth control including condoms, IUD, birth control pills, the rhythm method, vasectomy, and tubal ligation.

Hormonal birth control

Hormonal birth control include birth control pills, stick-on patches, insert able vaginal rings, shots, and implants but you’ll need a prescription for them. They use hormones, similar to the ones in your body, to stop the release of an egg so that it can’t get fertilized by sperm. This method is 90% effective but if done properly it can be 99% effective.

They use hormones, similar to the ones in your body, to stop the release of an egg so that it can't get fertilized by sperm.

Hormonal birth control include birth control pills, stick-on patches, insert able vaginal rings, shots, and implants but you’ll need a prescription for them.


Barrier birth control creates a barrier to keep sperm from reaching an egg. You can get most of them at a pharmacy with no prescription. Male condoms are reliable and cheap. They’re durable and may be more effective against sexually transmitted diseases. It is 80% effective and if used perfectly all the time, prevents 98% pregnancy. There are female condoms too that females insert in their vagina to create a barrier and to prevent sexually transmitted diseases. Female condoms are 80% effective.

Methods of birth control

You can also use spermicides, gels, creams, and foams. A few options like the diaphragm, cervical cap, and cervical shield are available only by prescription. They are rubber or silicon barrier that is placed far up in the vagina. They are about 90% effective.

They are rubber or silicon barrier that is placed far up in the vagina. They are about 90% effective.

You can also use spermicides, gels, creams, and foams.


Most emergency contraception products are ‘morning after’ pills. Though, it isn’t a form of regular birth control. It is for use after unprotected sex or if your condom breaks. It can prevent pregnancy up to 3 to 5 days later, although the sooner you take it, the better.
Thus, to use all these birth control methods, you should be highly prepared. You should check the expiry dates of the pills before taking it. You should store the condoms in the place where there is no heat or light. Read all the instructions carefully before taking pills or using condom. There are many side effects of the birth control methods. Birth control pills nausea weight gain, sore or swollen breasts, small amounts of blood, or spotting between periods, lighter periods and mood changes.

After effects of contraceptives

These contraceptives lead to heavy and painful periods, they also slash the number of periods you get per year. Women experience shorter periods when they are on the pills. It also reduces the risk of ovarian cancer. People get depressed with these pills but any emotional side effects can generally be alleviated by using a different pill formulation.  If you’re breastfeeding, steer clear of pills that contain estrogen can decrease breast-milk production.  Headaches, breast tenderness, water retention, mood swings can all make you pretty miserable. So, the switch might be all you need to start feeling like yourself again.

It also reduces the risk of ovarian cancer. People get depressed with these pills but any emotional side effects can generally be alleviated by using a different pill formulation.

These contraceptives lead to heavy and painful periods, they also slash the number of periods you get per year.


If you experience any of these, contact your doctor immediately. If you cannot reach your doctor, go to an emergency room or urgent care center for evaluation. These symptoms may indicate a serious disorder, such as liver disease, gallbladder disease, strokeblood clots, high blood pressure, or heart disease, abdominal pain, chest pain, headache, eye pain and swelling or aching in the legs and thighs.
Birth control pills can be taken safely by most women. They are not recommended, though, for women over the age of 35 who smoke. Moreover, you should not take hormonal contraceptives if you have had:

  • Blood clots in the arms, legs, or lungs
  • Serious heart or liver disease
  • Cancer of the breast or uterus
  • Uncontrolled high blood pressure

And remember to take the pills everyday at the same time and keep the pills with you, where ever you go. Consult a doctor once a month.
So, as we have read about birth control, we should control the use of these birth control methods as they are not good for the health and take precautions or use protections while sex. Moreover, we should also spread awareness among the people.

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